Fireworks, bonfires and aspergillosis

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From late October to new year it is common in the UK for fireworks to be lit. Traditional busy times of the year such as Bonfire Night are still the times of heaviest use but instead of all of the celebrations happening on one night, they can now spread over a week. New Year is also a time for fireworks in many parts of the world, though the actual day this is celebrated varies across the globe, with Chinese New Year celebrated at a completely different time of year compared with UK, US and much of the world outside of China.

Firework displays are enjoyed by many wherever and whenever they occur, but there is a downside for people with respiratory disease. Fireworks are made using lots of gunpowder and bonfires often contain lots of damp wood and other burnable materials. Asthma UK warns us that burning all that gunpowder and firewood causes the release of many irritants that we know can potentially cause asthmatic problems. The British Lung Foundation warns us that people with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) are also at risk. Many people with aspergillosis also have asthma and COPD – aspergillosis often comes along with, sometimes as a consequence of other respiratory diseases.

Outside air pollution

If the outside air is very still the irritants can persist and build up in a wide area around large displays, and of course, there are often many smaller displays scattered throughout the neighbourhood. It is pretty common in urban areas for the smoke to build up into an obvious fog with a strong smell which acts as a clear warning that the air is unsafe to breathe for some. Sometimes that fog is still apparent the next morning! However irritant gasses like nitrogen dioxide gas (NO2) can build up and be completely invisible – the gas is colourless and odourless, so be aware and remain vigilant for telltale symptoms of worsening breathing (ie coughing, wheezing, tightness in the chest or shortness of breath).

Airway irritants

Irritants such as very fine particulates in the smoke and NO2 in the exhaust gasses are known to cause asthma attacks so Asthma UK advises avoiding the smoke if you can and to make sure that you have taken your preventer inhaler as prescribed, Bring your reliever inhaler with you if going out and ensure that people around you know what to do should your breathing be affected.

Aspergillosis

People who have aspergillosis might also consider that autumn is a time for many trees to drop their leaves and other plant material to die back. The presence of so much food for moulds means that there can be lots of the Aspergillus fungus on the ground and in the air at these times of the year. Try to avoid places where there is lots of leaf mould being disturbed, for example by people walking to a display and it can be a good idea to wear a facemask to minimise the number of dust and spore particles you are inhaling. If wearing a facemask makes you feel uncomfortable there are now companies making attractive scarves that contain air filtration layer so when they are wrapped over your mouth & nose they provide reasonable protection.

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