Stoptober

Stoptober is an initiative which aims to help people quit smoking. The dangers of smoking are well understood, but for those with chronic lung conditions the risks can be even greater – for example smokers are 5 times more likely to catch the flu, a major complication for aspergillosis patients.

We have had 2 talks at the National Aspergillosis Centre patient and carer support meeting that mentioned smoking and aspergillosis. At one meeting, Dr Khaled Al-shair (National Aspergillosis Centre Researcher) spoke of several guidelines to help patients suffering from Chronic Pulmonary Aspergillosis (CPA) feel their best while being treated at the NAC. Exercise and good diet played their part but one of the major improvements many patients can make to their lifestyle was to stop smoking cigarettes.

We have also had a talk from our local ‘Stop Smoking’ nurse – this talk focused what can be done locally using UHSM (University Hospital of South Manchester) services; so if you are a NAC patient or live withing striking distance of UHSM (Manchester, UK) you can take advantage of this help directly. There was also extensive information for anyone about the advantages of giving up cigarettes and different strategies to employ when trying to find a way to stop smoking.

The NHS also provides a wealth of information and advice on quitting smoking which can be found here.

Advice for people with respiratory conditions in winter

Many patients with respiratory conditions like aspergillosis report increased frequency of chest infections during the winter months, and this is mentioned repeatedly in our Facebook support groups (Public, Private). The cold weather brings problems of many kinds, but respiratory infection is one of the most serious. Infections by bacteria or virus have a major impact on their quality of life as their breathing becomes restricted and often they quickly become too exhausted to carry on with tasks of daily living.

Why does the winter cause increased vulnerability to respiratory infections? Is it because of the cold weather making us weaker and unable to fight off infection? In part – yes it is! Cold air cannot hold moisture as well as warmer air and thus cold air, is drier air. Inhaling dry air tends to dry out our airways and this can make us vulnerable to infection. This has two impacts – it irritates the lining of our airways and makes us cough, which itself increases our risk of infection, but it also dries out the mucous lining our airways and makes it more difficult to move – so we end up coughing much more than normal as we try to cough up this thickened substance.

People with chronic respiratory disease such as COPD, asthma, aspergillosis are particularly vulnerable to dry air as their airways are very sensitive to irritation.

Winter holds all kinds of pressures for the NHS and one of the biggest is a huge increase in people with respiratory conditions whose condition has become worse as a result of the cold weather. This video includes some advice on how to make sure the cold doesn’t affect your condition to prevent you from needing hospital treatment.

Reproduced with thanks, produced by NHS Blackpool CCG 2019

We Are Undefeatable

We Are Undefeatable is a campaign which aims to help those with chronic health conditions exercise. Both the conditions and forms of exercise vary widely – the goal is to find out what works best for you!

Visit the website to discover how exercise has helped other people with chronic conditions, and what the campaign can do for you : We Are Undefeatable

For more information on exercises specific to aspergillosis and chronic lung conditions:

Yoga for lung condition patients

The Irish Lung Fibrosis Association has produced an hour-long video, which takes viewers through yoga exercises suitable for patients with lung fibrosis and other respiratory conditions. Exercise is key to a healthy lifestyle, and can improve quality of life in those who suffer from lung conditions. If you struggle to stand, the first half of the video is devoted to exercises that can be done sitting in a chair.

Further information about exercising with aspergillosis:

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